Mental Health, Save a Mate

Sometimes a conversation can make all the difference.

Qube recognise mental health is vital, which is why when it comes to your mates, ask the question, R U OK? We are in this together, which is why when you notice a change in your mates, check in with them from time to time and see if they are okay.

You may not have all the answers, but at times we each need some extra support, and starting a conversation can be a great place to start. Make sure to respect what your mates say, and pick a good time and location to start a conversation. It is important to not judge anyone for the way they are feeling, and make sure to encourage your mates to act. By encouraging your mates to take action you could make a difference to their life!

Always remember to check back in with them to see how they are feeling.

You don’t need to be a superhero to save your mates, check in with them often and ask “R U OK?”

 

Encourage Action

Someone is always available and willing to listen to you and provide support. If you ever feel that you need to chat, remember these free services are available at any time.

Lifeline
Call 131114
www.lifeline.org.au
Free Crisis Support Chat

AccessEAP
1800 81 87 28
www.accesseap.com.au
Available 24/7 to provide immediate help for urgent matters.

Resources

Videos

Depression Test

The following tool is an easy and anonymous self-test depression tool designed to provide you with a personalised approach for you to assess how you are currently feeling. The tool takes only one minute to complete and will provide you with some tips and suggestions based on your results.

This 9 question test takes only one minute to complete and will provide you with some tips and suggestions based on your results.

Take a close look at the following questions and rate them in relation to how you have been feeling in the past two weeks compared to how you normally feel.

Quiz Progress

Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems?

1. Little interest or pleasure in doing things

  • Not at all
  • Several times
  • More than half of the time
  • Nearly every day

2. Feeling down, depressed or hopeless

  • Not at all
  • Several times
  • More than half of the time
  • Nearly every day

3. Trouble falling or staying asleep or sleeping too much

  • Not at all
  • Several times
  • More than half of the time
  • Nearly every day

4. Feeling tired or having little energy

  • Not at all
  • Several times
  • More than half of the time
  • Nearly every day

5. Poor appetite or overeating

  • Not at all
  • Several times
  • More than half of the time
  • Nearly every day

6. Feeling bad about yourself – that you are a failure or have let yourself or your family down

  • Not at all
  • Several times
  • More than half of the time
  • Nearly every day

7. Trouble concentrating on things, such as reading the newspaper or watching television

  • Not at all
  • Several times
  • More than half of the time
  • Nearly every day

8. Moving or speaking so slowly that other people could have noticed. Or the opposite – being so fidgety or restless that you have been moving around a lot more than usual

  • Not at all
  • Several times
  • More than half of the time
  • Nearly every day

9. Thoughts that you would be better off dead, or of hurting yourself

  • Not at all
  • Several times
  • More than half of the time
  • Nearly every day
Normal
Mild
Moderate
Severe

Your Results - Normal (0 to 4)

Great work on completing the survey!

Looks like you are feeling well at the moment. However these surveys can never be 100% accurate so if this result doesn't fit how you are feeling at this time we strongly encourage you to speak with your GP.

The Black Dog Institute recommends the following for people who receive this result on this self-test depression tool.

 

Tips for staying well

Take time to enjoy, share interests, contribute and challenge yourself.

Every week plan and do activities you enjoy to keep your mind healthy. Do a crossword, take a walk in your local park, read a book, listen to music; the possibilities are endless!

You may even like to join a club or group of people who share your interests, such as a dance, theatre, choir or walking group or perhaps a book, sports or car club.

Volunteering for a cause that you care about or doing something nice for someone can help you feel good about yourself. You can also build confidence by learning a new skill or working towards a goal.

Why not try one of the above tips to keep your mind healthy this week!

 

Take care of yourself

Physical and mental wellbeing are closely linked. It is easier to feel good about life if your body feels good. Regular exercise is scientifically proven to increase the health of your body and mind. Exercise includes all different kinds of things like gardening, cleaning, dancing, walking and swimming.

Combining regular physical activity with a balanced diet can keep you feeling good.

Get plenty of sleep as it is important for restoring your body and mind.

Lastly, avoid excessive use of alcohol and other drugs to keep your mind healthy.

 

Speak to yourself in a kind way

Sometimes we can be very critical of ourselves without even knowing it. A good trick is to try to speak to yourself in your mind the way you would speak to someone you care about if they were having a tough time. Remember be kind to yourself!

And don't forget if you ever feel really down or worried you can also call Lifeline on 13 11 14.

Understanding that mental health is vital, Qube has partnered with AccessEAP to offer you access to support resources when and where you need it most. Call 1800 81 87 28 – 27/7 or for more information click here.

The findings of this tool have been sourced from The Black Dog Institute, for more information on The Black Dog Institute and to access a range of tools that can provide you with further information click here.

Your Results

Mild (5 to 9)

Great work on completing the survey!

Although this kind of survey is not always 100% accurate, it appears that you may have a couple of things on your mind at the moment. This is the case for most people so why not have a chat to your doctor who will have some good ideas about how to help. When you do make an appointment, ask the receptionist for a long appointment to ensure you have plenty of time with your doctor to discuss how you are feeling.

The Black Dog Institute recommends the following for people who receive this result on this self-test depression tool.

 

Monitoring your progress

To make the most of your visit to your GP, we recommend completing a daily mood chart.

At the same time each day use the chart by rating your level of mood and/or worries on a scale of 1-10, where 1 is the worst and 10 is the best. You may like to rate your mood and/or worry level in the morning and evening if there is significant variation during the day. You may like to use the Black Dog Institute mood chart

 

Getting help online

Understanding that mental health is vital, Qube has partnered with AccessEAP to offer you access to support resources when and where you need it most. Call 1800 81 87 28 – 27/7 or for more information click here.

 

Take care of yourself

Physical and mental wellbeing are closely linked; it is easier to feel good about life if your body feels good. There is now strong scientific evidence that regular exercise improves the health of your mind as well as your body. Exercise includes all different kinds of things like gardening, cleaning, dancing, walking and swimming.

Combining regular physical activity with a balanced diet can keep you feeling good.

Get plenty of sleep as it is important for restoring your body and mind.

Lastly, avoid excessive use of alcohol and other drugs to keep your mind healthy.

And don't forget if you ever feel really down or worried you can also call Lifeline on 13 11 14.

The findings of this tool have been sourced from The Black Dog Institute, for more information on The Black Dog Institute and to access a range of tools that can provide you with further information click here.

Your Results

Moderate (10 to 19)

Great work on completing the survey!

Although this kind of survey is not always 100% accurate, it appears that you may have a couple of things on your mind at the moment.

This is the case for many people so the next step is to talk to your doctor or your mental health clinician who will have some good ideas about how to help.

The Black Dog Institute recommends the following for people who receive this result on this self-test depression tool.

 

Booking an appointment

We strongly suggest you make an appointment to speak with your doctor and/or mental health clinician who will have some good ideas about how to help and can talk to you about ways to improve your wellbeing. When you make an appointment with your doctor, ask the receptionist for a long appointment to ensure you have plenty of time with your doctor to discuss how you are feeling. If you do not have a mental health clinician, your doctor can refer you to one. A mental health clinician such as a clinical psychologist can help you to learn skills and strategies to feel better.

 

Getting help online

Understanding that mental health is vital, Qube has partnered with AccessEAP to offer you access to support resources when and where you need it most. Call 1800 81 87 28 – 27/7 or for more information click here.

 

Monitoring your progress

To make the most of your visit to your GP and/or mental health clinician, we recommend monitoring your mood. You can do this via myCompass or by completing a daily mood chart.

If using our daily mood chart you should rate your level of mood and/or worries at the same time each day on a scale of 1-10, where 1 is the worst and 10 is the best. You may like to rate your mood and/or worry level in the morning and evening if there is a noticeable change during the day. You may like to use the Black Dog Institute mood chart.

And don't forget if you ever feel really down or worried you can also call Lifeline on 13 11 14.

The findings of this tool have been sourced from The Black Dog Institute, for more information on The Black Dog Institute and to access a range of tools that can provide you with further information click here.

Your Results

Severe (20 to 27)

Great work on completing the survey!

Although this kind of survey is not always 100% accurate, it appears that you have quite a few things on your mind at the moment.

This is the case for many people and your GP or a mental health clinician such as a clinical psychologist and/or a psychiatrist can help. Remember that feelings change over time and there are a lot of strategies that your doctor can talk to you about that will make you feel better

The Black Dog Institute recommends the following for people who receive this result on this self-test depression tool.

 

Booking an appointment

It is really important that you speak with someone so please make an appointment to see your doctor as soon as possible so you can talk about ways to improve your wellbeing! If you do not have a mental health clinician, your GP can help you organise an appointment with a clinical Psychologist and/or a psychiatrist.

 

Monitoring your progress

To make the most of your visit to your GP and/or mental health clinician, we recommend monitoring your mood. You can do this via myCompass or by completing a daily mood chart.

If using our daily mood chart you should rate your level of mood and/or worries at the same time each day on a scale of 1-10, where 1 is the worst and 10 is the best. You may like to rate your mood and/or worry level in the morning and evening if there is a noticeable change during the day. You may like to use the Black Dog Institute mood chart.

And don't forget if you ever feel really down or worried you can also call Lifeline on 13 11 14.

If you feel very distressed and are having thoughts of harming yourself call the self-harm service on 1300 659 467 or triple zero (000).

Understanding that mental health is vital, Qube has partnered with AccessEAP to offer you access to support resources when and where you need it most. Call 1800 81 87 28 – 27/7 or for more information click here.

The findings of this tool have been sourced from The Black Dog Institute, for more information on The Black Dog Institute and to access a range of tools that can provide you with further information click here.